public forum
home forum magazine gallery links about faq courtesy
It is currently Sat Apr 19, 2014 2:22 pm

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 89 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 3:38 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2008 8:53 am
Posts: 21
Location: Canada
Michael,

You miss my point altogether.

I have no issues with Mr. Jelinek, as I have not heard of him nor seen him dance. I am sure he will be fine. I do agree that NBC needs more competent principals to carry a heavy male dancing load.

I was trying to discuss another matter completely, that of a lack of recent Canadian hirings.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 5:04 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat May 27, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 1863
Location: Stouffville, Ontario, Canada
Guten Tag Millie, ich glaube (I believe) the below key quotes inspired most of these posts:

Quote:
“I think there are some amazingly talented men who could be promoted from within the company to principal status.

... I have no problem with some talented dancers coming to NBC but am wondering at the recent trend at the expense of the company members who have worked so hard here.”


Bottom line: You would like to see Mrs. K promote Keiichi Hirano, Richard Landry or Etienne Lavigne to principal because they have worked hard and put in their time. I’m sure they have worked hard and they have put in their time. Work and time unfortunately do not guarantee a principal who will shine on stage and draw in the fans. We live in the ‘I want it now instant microwaveable generation!’ Quite frankly, I view many of the male soloists as merely serviceable and I only see Hirano as worthy of promotion assuming he can develop his stage charisma and be ready to dance a full ballet.

Obviously, Mrs. K and I’m sure most if not all of her Artistic Staff are of the same opinion. I don’t always agree with all her moves but I am totally in simpatico with her recent foreign signings. She should present the best product possible regardless of where the talent was born. It’s been proven time and time over and over and over again in professional sports that you cannot be successful without considering all countries.

I’m sure this may rub many benefactors and parents of NBS kids the wrong way but like it or not, this is the way it is. You’re not just competing against NBS; you are competing against ballet schools and companies worldwide. :wink:

_________________
The world revolves around the beauty of the ballerina.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 6:45 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat May 27, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 1863
Location: Stouffville, Ontario, Canada
We’ve been discussing nationality so much, I decided to crunch the numbers from the National’s current roster-Not including apprentices we have 30 Canadian born and 33 from all over the globe. I believe that is a very fair representation. We all come from somewhere and in the end, we are all human.

In my view of the stage, the National was desperate for a male principal who could headline a card and act as a mentor for other dancers. They needed more than just Guillaume Côté. Zehr was another great addition given all the visits by the Stork over the past few years!

I’m very confident Jelinek will bring a lot to both the stage along with dance class. You learn a lot just by watching and listening to others. Anyone know how many languages he speaks?

_________________
The world revolves around the beauty of the ballerina.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 22, 2009 9:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat May 27, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 1863
Location: Stouffville, Ontario, Canada
Tanznetz interviews Jiri Jelinek who reveals part of the reason he left Stuttgart Ballet was for more opportunities after his dance career is over-Perhaps as an actor. Not sure if he meant stage, movie, TV, or perhaps as a character actor for the National? By ‘special career programs,’ he may have been referring to the Dancer Transition Centre.

Quote:
But look beyond the stage he has to face as a classical dancer with the specific challenges of his profession. "In my early 30's I have, like all classical dancer, think carefully about my further career prospects," said Jelinek for his future plans. "In Stuttgart I have achieved a lot. I do not expect from Canada in the first place new dance challenges, but more diverse perspectives for a second career - for example, as an actor. There is an infrastructure that special career programs for dancers, which allow the End stage career plan and prepare.

_________________
The world revolves around the beauty of the ballerina.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 8:52 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Nov 05, 2008 10:45 am
Posts: 99
Location: Toronto
Quote:
We’ve been discussing nationality so much, I decided to crunch the numbers from the National’s current roster-Not including apprentices we have 30 Canadian born and 33 from all over the globe. I believe that is a very fair representation.


I agree, a rough 50/50 split does seem fair to me. I think KK is more than happy to promote Canadian dancers if they're ready and meet the requirements. At least, that's my impression.

But it's something I admit I'd not given much thought to, so thank you for raising the point, Millie. It's always interesting to hear from all sides of the debate. :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 5:45 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Aug 01, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 290
Location: Ontario, Canada
If the new principal is nearing the end of his dancing career, I am worried..............

Also - I see Millie's point in wondering why we don't see more Canadians hired. I could name names, but have already done that, so it seems pointless to repeat.

We have very talented Canadian dancers. I can appreciate that companies might want to hire a principal from abroad, but am less convinced for new to corps hires or promotions.

Michael, perhaps we will just have to agree to disagree.

m2


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 7:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat May 27, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 1863
Location: Stouffville, Ontario, Canada
We will never know the reasons why unless Mrs. K tells us, which I doubt because she wouldn’t want to criticize her own dancers in public. By hiring Jiri Jelinek it is obvious she feels he can fill a void. I wonder if some of the soloist males could dance through a full length ballet like Onegin without forgetting some steps? You need to build up your experience and hence I suspect that is why double J is moving to Canada.

How much does double A have left in the tank? Will Guillaume Côté be tempted to dance for a more prestigious company? Can Zdenek Konvalina develop his stage charisma? Is Piotr Stanczyk a true romantic lead or is he better suited to play the role of the villain?

Perhaps one day the above will be the least of our concerns? If you had your choice between watching a live performance for $25 beamed into your TV from the Paris Opera Ballet, Royal Ballet, or NYCB would you forgo seeing live performances in person? The above will be our future one day.

_________________
The world revolves around the beauty of the ballerina.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2009 7:13 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat May 27, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 1863
Location: Stouffville, Ontario, Canada
Paula Citron previews ‘Watch Her.’

_________________
The world revolves around the beauty of the ballerina.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Nov 25, 2009 11:56 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 27, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 3373
Location: Canada
It's late, so a brief review with more to come tomorrow when the eyes are wider open!

Overall, the triple bill was quite a daring step for the company in that in required almost the whole corps in each ballet, and at least one principal danced in all three ballets. One has to wonder how wise it is to push a company with such a program as it leaves very little leeway for adjustments due to injury and illness. The program might have been better designed with a pas de deux (or two) or a small group piece in the middle to allow the corps some down time and not overstress the principals.

The Four Temperaments was elegantly danced by the soloists, particularly Zdenek Konvalina in the Melancholic solo. Konvalina was easily the class of the ballet, with a sinuousity and speed that is tailor-made for Balanchine. Alexsandar Antonijevic is smooth in Phlegmatic, but it felt like he has slowed down just a touch and lost a bit of the flexibility through his back. It was hard to put a finger on, but there was something slight just missing in his performance.

McGee Maddox was an announced replacement for Piotr Stanczyk in Sanguinic, a significant assignment for a new corps member. Maddox was competent as a partner for Heather Ogden, but his lack of experience was clear in comparison to the other soloists. Maddox is a tall, solid dancer, perhaps not (yet) best suited for this type of Balanchine. The steps are there, but the crispness, flow and speed are still developing. It was curious that the company went with such a young dancer, but it may be a matter of finding a tall enough dancer and one who wasn't busy with rehearsals for solos in other ballets on the program.

Unfortunately, the corps was in clear need of more rehearsal time. At times one or more dancers were obviously out of synch with everyone else, and in one pose, the four female dancers had their weight distributed so differently that one wondered if they all understood the intended position. The talent is there, but it's not quite refined yet, and NBoC doesn't have the breakneck speed/attack that allows NYCB to get away with being a bit rough in spots.


I'm not all certain what to make of Azure Barton's "Watch Her". There are fascinating sections, but it might be too long and too rambling to be very cohesive. It's as if Barton didn't have a clear idea where she was going with the piece - no overall concept and too many characters for the audience to be able to develop some attachment or understanding.

The piece takes place in a courtyard or room surrounded by marble or concrete walls with five doorways on each side and a lone window towards the back. Think of a plain Grand Central Station. The costume - suits for the men and long skirts with shirtwaist like coats for the women - hint at an early 20th century setting. Which to me gave it a bit of an immigrant, Ellis Island feeling. However when the women shed their coats, the tank top dresses served to dislocate the ballet from any specific time period.

Over the course of the ballet we are introduced to a number of female characters and then they seem to pull in a repulse. Sonia Rodriguez is the women in red who seems to be a seductress, possibly a prostitute (the choreography makes some heavy hints towards intimate relations). Bridgett Zehr - who is the current company star along with Heather Ogden - is a young, innocent women who attracts men, but may be having some sort of marital/boyfriend spat. Heather Ogden is the other main woman, but the details of her character did not stick.

There are also a number of men who interact with these women, but it was hard to really figure out what they meant or why they changed or why we should care. Barton has a way with moving large corps, creating some memorable images, but the movement sometimes seems at odds with Lena Aurebach's score, and the ballet seemed to wander rather than move with purpose. It's a piece that may have needed more time in rehearsal and a sharper editing eye. Longer does not necessarily mean better, and what may be fascinating for the dancers may not be so for the audience.

Despite losing focus during the ballet, Barton comes up with an ending that draws the viewer in again. In the courtyard or room two women appear to position one man, another watching from the front of the stage. The light shifts to reveal the heads of the entire cast watching from just above the top of the back wall. A lone tree trunk is in one corner. It felt jail like - was this an execution ground or a cell - and then the front wall silently lowers from the ceiling to close off the room and our view. But with the watching man isolated on the front of the stage (a bit confusing for the audience as he's in front of the curtain and doesn't leave until it rises for the curtain calls).

Jerome Robbins' 'Glass Pieces' is a challenge for any company, let alone for a corps that has already been through two tough ballets. NBoC made a very gallant effort, but like Four Temperaments, sections were still in need of much rehearsal. The high point was Facades, led by the outstanding Zehr and Konvalina, who danced in all and two of the ballets respectively. With the female corp slowly moving along the back of the stage, the two wove a spell in the intricate, fluid pas de deux. The captured the eye, not releasing it until the music ended.

Funeral for Akhnaten was boldly danced, but there was evidence of tiredness in the never-quite-all together nature of the male groupings. NBoC has many talented men, but it's asking a lot to do three intense ballets on a single program.

Rubric involves a large cast walking quickly in un-ending, near collision patterns to music that is all but uncountable. It's not something for the faint of heart! On this evening, there was colorful energy, but a sense of slight hesitation and lack of the bold speed that comes from being comfortable enough with the choreography to 'let it rip'. It's something that will hopefully come with more rehearsals and performances.

Intriguingly, while the women were very natural in Rubric, a number of the men looked entirely too stiff and un-natural in the hectic walking patterns. Someone needs to work with the men, in particular, to get them to let go of the stiff formality of normal ballet walking. Half jokingly, I'd suggest a field trip to New York City, and Grand Central Station in particular. Until you've experienced the intricate, deft, fast, individual way that people walk in a busy open space like Grand Central Station, I think you don't quite grasp what Robbins was after. I've also seem Rubric as a balletic version of the NY pedestrian and an ode to the streets of New York.

NBoC, as a note, seems to have subtly altered the costumes to make the ballet more contemporary. The headbands worn by some of the soloists are gone, and many of the Rubric costumes are of a much less shiny material. It's not major, but it does remove some of the slightly cheesy 70s nature of the piece which so clearly ties it to an era.

Overall, a triple bill that is worth another viewing, but is a bit worrying given the stresses it places on the dancers. The book ending of the Barton's new ballet with the two classics does put the world premiere in perspective. Barton may have talent, but she could learn a lot from those who came before her...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 26, 2009 8:00 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat May 27, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 1863
Location: Stouffville, Ontario, Canada
Thanks for the thought provoking and detailed review Kate. Michael Crabb, now firmly entrenched at the Toronto Star, gives the mixed fare 4 stars.

Quote:
Barton's ballet crackles with sexual tension too; not a battle of the sexes but a catalogue of longings, regrets, hopes and, perhaps, the occasional victim.


EyeWeekly and Now Mag provide previews.

_________________
The world revolves around the beauty of the ballerina.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 27, 2009 1:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat May 27, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 1863
Location: Stouffville, Ontario, Canada
Paula Citron and the Toronto Sun rave over the triple bill!

Quote:
All eyes, however, were on Aszure Barton's world premiere Watch Her . New York-based, Edmonton-born Barton has a growing international reputation as a formidable choreographer, and this powerful piece does not disappoint. The minute it was over, I wanted to press the replay button so I could begin to come to grips with Barton's many layers, particularly her detailed gestural language.


It was an enjoyable evening for myself as well. There is bound to be something to please one and all in the rather melancholy 4 Temperaments, interesting but hard to figure Watch Her, along with the cherry to top off the evening in the joyful Glass Pieces.

I didn’t quite know what to make of Watch Her. Perhaps it should be renamed 'The Chilly Chick in the Pretty Red Dress?' Most of the action seemed to revolve around her in the form of the very lovely Sonia Rodriquez Browning. I felt sorry for the guys in the white shirts who looked like they were having a very bad day. The guys in the suits reminded me of the painting, ‘The Son of Man’ by Rene Magritte without the green apple. The set appears to build from the greyish brick along the bottom of the painting. Perhaps Miss Barton wants to tell us that ‘The Son of Man’ needs a woman to break free from his silent painted state?

Glass Pieces was the perfect ballet to send one and all home happy. According to Rex Harrington the costumes remind him of a Jane Fonda Workout Video! That may be so but nonetheless this rhythmic tribute to ballet rehearsals was loads of fun even though it appeared to be danced in front of a shower wall!! You get a lot of ballet for your buck in this triple bill.

Pssst Millie, I believe you should keep your eye on Brett van Sickle. I’m sure he will satisfy your heart’s desire to see a Canadian promoted and dance his way into your heart! :wink:

I look forward to reading Kate’s complete review! What’s the deal with only 1,314 words? :lol:

_________________
The world revolves around the beauty of the ballerina.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 28, 2009 3:53 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat May 27, 2000 11:01 pm
Posts: 1863
Location: Stouffville, Ontario, Canada
Kimberly Glasco recently was a guest teacher at The Profile Dance Company. Miss Glasco inspired quite a lot of prose on CD-Of which I was certainly guilty for my fair share! How the time has passed. She possessed a very unique ballerina beauty, which I found very appealing. It’s very sad things ended the way they did because I thought she would make a great character artist.
Image

_________________
The world revolves around the beauty of the ballerina.


Top
 Profile E-mail  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 12:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Nov 05, 2008 10:45 am
Posts: 99
Location: Toronto
I saw the mixed programme on Thursday night and thought it was wonderful. The Balanchine was definitely the weakest portion. Not that it was bad by any means, but just didn' knock my socks off. There were a few wobbles here and there and the material wasn't my favourite. I'm glad they put it first.

I absolutely loved "Watch Her." What did it all mean? I haven't the foggiest! But I was mesmerized throughout. There was quite a lot of loud banging from behind the curtain between the first and second acts and obviously I realized why when I saw the set. When Kevin Bowles jumped up into the window of the front wall, it wobbled a bit and for a moment I was afraid it would topple over! Thankfully it didn't.

I loved the costuming for this piece, especially the suits for the men. They all looked quite fetching, I must say. As I said, what the ballet is actually about is beyond me, but I don't mind at all. I agree with the critic who wanted to press the rewind button as soon as it was over.

I really do admire KK's commitment to exploring new choreography and not just sticking to the classics. It's hit and miss, but "Watch Her" was a hit in my books.

One note: As much as I admire Bridgett Zehr's excellent dancing, her thinness detracts from the performance for me. I know ballerinas generally don't have an ounce of fat on them, but she looks alarmingly skinny. I find it distracting and I honestly worry about her health. I know for some people it's just natural, and I hope that's the case with Bridgett, but I think she'd look so much better on stage if she gained a bit of weight.

This was my second viewing of "Glass Pieces" and I enjoyed it very much. Patrick Lavoie was a standout for me in this one.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 1:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 27, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 3373
Location: Canada
The final version.... and yes, the original was more than the few words it was intended to be....


The Four Temperaments, Watch Her, Glass Pieces
The National Ballet of Canada
November 25, 2009
Four Seasons Centre, Toronto, CAN

The National Ballet of Canada’s first triple bill of the 2009-2010 season could have easily been described as a celebration of the corps de ballet. Incorporating the full range of stage-filling non-story ballet from Balanchine’s 1946 black and white classic “The Four Temperaments”, to the early eighties “Glass Pieces” by Jerome Robbins and the world premiere of Aszure Barton’s “Watch Her”, the program put the company’s corps front and centre. However, with a medium size company such as NBoC, a corps heavy triple-bill can be a risky undertaking, and indeed on this evening the lasting memories were of stand-out solo performances and the striking choreography, not the corps.

Balanchine’s “The Four Temperaments” never ceases to amaze, each viewing revealing new facets of the brilliant, ingenious harmony of choreography and music (Paul Hindemith). On this occasion, it was the dancing by the soloists - particularly that of Zdenek Konvalina in the Melancholic solo - which left an imprint on the memory. Konvalina, who along with Guillaume Côté is carrying the lion’s share of the company’s male principal repertoire, was easily the class of the ballet, with a sinuosity and crisp speed tailor-made for Balanchine. Though elegant in Phlegmatic, Alexsandar Antonijevic revealed the slightest whispers of age – a bit of slowness in movement and loss of flexibility through his back. It was hard to put a finger on, but there was something just missing in his performance.

McGee Maddox was an announced replacement for Piotr Stanczyk in Sanguinic, a significant assignment for a new corps member. There were no missteps in the pas de deux with Heather Ogden, but Maddox’s lack of experience was clear in comparison to the other soloists. He’s is a tall, solidly built dancer who has lots of potential, but while the steps are there, the crispness, flow and speed are still developing. I’d love to see him as Theseus, or Titania’s Cavalier in Balanchine’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” or as the dreamy sailor in “Fancy Free”, but he’s still lacking the fast-twitch reflexes and stamina for black & white Balanchine.

The corps, however, was in clear need of more rehearsal time. At times some dancers were clearly out of synch with everyone else, and in one extended pose, the four female dancers had their weight distributed so differently that one wondered if they all understood the intended position. Hopefully the corps will improve as they get more performance experience, since NBoC doesn't have the breakneck speed and attack that allows a company like New York City Ballet to get away with a certain degree of roughness.

Azure Barton's "Watch Her" remains a bit of a mystery that needs another viewing to be fully assessed. There were fascinating sections, but on first sight, the piece felt too long and rambling to be entirely cohesive. It's as if Barton didn't have a clear idea where she was going with the piece - no overall concept and too many characters for a viewer to be able to develop some attachment or understanding.

“Watch Her” is set in a space surrounded by marble or concrete walls with five doorways on each side – a sort of generic Grand Central Station or a hidden inner-city courtyard designed by Yannik Larivée. The piece begins and ends on the outside of this space, a lone man sitting on windowsill, surveying the scene before the front wall lifts to reveal the scene or lowers to hide it. The costumes (suits for the men and long skirts with shirtwaist-like coats for the women) hint at an early 20th century setting. However when the women shed their coats, the dresses underneath are very much era-neutral.

Over the course of the ballet, as observed by the man first seen in the windowsill, we glimpse into the lives of several female characters. Sonia Rodriguez was the sultry woman in red, a seductress who may or may not be a prostitute (the choreography makes some heavy hints towards intimate relations). Bridgett Zehr - the company’s current female star along with Heather Ogden - was a youthful, innocent woman who attracted men, but not without incident. Heather Ogden was the other main woman, but the details of her character did not stick. Even without her vivid red dress, Rodriguez’s performance would have stood out for it’s stark emotion. Barton never fills in the details about these women, but Rodriguez created a woman who was sultry, but sad, fierce, but fragile. The men who interact with these women were by and large a faceless bunch because it was hard to figure out what they meant to the women or why we should care about these relationships.

Beyond the sections for the women in red, the power in “Watch Her” came from the sweeping sections for the large corps. Barton has flair for moving corps around stage, and created some memorable images. However, the movement was sometimes at odds with Lera Auerbach's score, and the ballet seemed to wander rather than move with purpose. Longer does not necessarily mean better, and “Watch Her” would probably benefit from a sharper editing eye.

Despite losing focus during the ballet, Barton comes up with a fascinating ending. In the courtyard or room two women appear to position one man centre stage, another watching from the front of the stage. The light shifts to reveal the heads of the entire cast watching from just above the top of the back wall. A lone tree trunk is in one corner. The effect was eerie and claustrophobic – were we in a jail, or even an execution ground? Then, the row of heads still watching, the front wall silently lowers from the ceiling to close off the room and our view. But with the watching man isolated on the front of the stage.

Jerome Robbins' 'Glass Pieces' is a challenge for any company, let alone for a corps that has already been through two tough ballets. NBoC made a very gallant effort, but the corps looked under-rehearsed, particularly in Rubric.

Rubric involves a large cast walking quickly in unending, near-collision patterns to racing, relentless, percussive music by Philip Glass. I've also seem Rubric as Robbins’ ode to the pedestrians and streets of New York City, and like NYC, ‘Glass Pieces’ is not for the faint of heart. On this evening, the corps was buoyant, but one could sense a slight hesitation as if the dancers needed a bit more time to be comfortable enough with the choreography to 'let it rip'. With a few more performances under their belt, the corps should be on the top of their game.

While the women were very natural in Rubric, a number of the men looked entirely too stiff in the hectic walking patterns. It’s not easy to let go of the stiff formality of normal ballet walking - half jokingly, I'd suggest a field trip to Grand Central Station in New York City because it’s hard to grasp Robbins’ intent until you've experienced the intricate, deft, fast, individual way that people walk in such a busy open space.

The high point was Facades, led by the outstanding Zehr and Konvalina. With the female corps slowly moving along the back of the stage, the two wove a spell in the intricate, fluid pas de deux. From the start, they captured the eye, not releasing it until the music ended.

NBoC, as a note, appears to have subtly altered the costumes to make the ballet more contemporary. The headbands worn by some of the soloists are gone, and many of the Rubric costumes seem to be much more matte, rather than the shiny material of the originals.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2009 1:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 27, 2000 12:01 am
Posts: 3373
Location: Canada
This didn't quite fit with my formal review, but it is something I was to express, so....


Once again, though the company’s selection of repertoire can hardly be faulted, the programs and over-casting of the company’s dancers is worrisome. Whether due to financial realities or the perceived likes of the Toronto audience, NBoC seems reluctant to stray from the literal three 30-40 minute principal & corps ballets conception of the triple bill. Even with the wonderful choreography such as was on display this pas week, it’s a recipe that not only gets tedious for the regular viewer, but puts stresses on the company’s limited numbers. For instance, in this program, only three of the company’s four male principals were cast, and only two danced on opening night. Which doesn't leave much rest for the men... On the women’s side, most female principals danced in two ballets, with Bridgett Zehr dancing in all three ballets. It’s wonderful to have the opportunity to see such talent, but if it’s pushed so much, will the talent burn out before it ever artistically matures?

Why not – as the company will be doing in Spring 2010 with Opus 19/The Dreamer– experiment with including more, but shorter ballets or pas de deux that require fewer dancers, and add variety to an evening’s entertainment. A repertoire evening including up to five shorter ballets could not only give the corps a chance to rest, but allow chances for young dancers to take on new challenges. For instance, why not give Elena Lobsanova and Noah Long a few more chances to show off their Le Corsaire pas de deux that was one of the Erik Bruhn Competition highlights?! There are lots of wonderful pas deux or short, small group ballets out there, and one doesn’t have to have every world premiere be a huge production (some of Christopher Wheeldon’s finest pieces have been pas de deux!).


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 89 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6  Next

All times are UTC - 7 hours [ DST ]


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
The messages in this forum are posted by members of the general public and do not reflect the opinions or beliefs of CriticalDance or its staff.
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group